No need to fight it out… even at Court

Sometimes your dispute ends up in court, whether or not it was you who made the application. Should this happen, it doesn’t necessarily mean that you have a fight to the bitter end on your hands.

Court process has its place in helping divorcing couples to sort out their finances and/or shared care of their children. Strict timetables and court-ordered requirements to provide documents and information help to move disputes forward. They also narrow the issues that prevent agreements from being reached.

It’s good to talk

While you can feel stuck in the system, if you approach things the right way you can still be creative with your arrangements – ultimately retaining control over your costs and the important decisions that may shape the rest of your life.

It is completely possible – and indeed expected by the court – for you and your ex to continue to negotiate in between hearings. You can communicate through your lawyers and speak directly with each other. In our experience, it’s always possible to reopen communication – even at the point of impasse when litigation seems the only answer.

Good representation doesn’t have to involve aggression

At Sharp Family Law, we know the UK court process well, and our lawyers are experienced managers of family court litigation. But we don’t just follow the formula, we actively continue to seek solutions at every stage of the process.

In reality, only 5% of cases end up with judges deciding final outcomes. You and your legal team can be strong, protective and constructive without the need to be aggressive or ‘nasty’. In fact, aggression and nastiness simply serve to inflame conflict and ramp up legal fees – adding to the stress of being at court in the first place.

Approaching litigation practically and with an eye on real-life outcomes will help you to divorce with dignity, as well as control.

Article by Sharon Giles

Sharon helps clients to reshape and rebuild their lives beyond a breakup and preserve relationships for the long term. She encourages them to look beyond their present situation, to visualise an alternative future and make informed and realistic decisions to shape it.